YTCAF Donor Program

You can make a memorial to remember a very special friend or special pet or you can honor someone or their accomplishments or just make a donation via our donor program.  You can:

  • Make a donation by check or money order, using this form, mailed to our Treasurer at:
    Gloria Lyon, Treasurer
    YTCA Foundation
    526 N West Avenue PMB 46
    Arlington, WA 98223
  • Donate by using our Pay Pal donate button
  • Donate books, figurines, art, or other goods or services of value that YTCAF can auction at our yearly auctions
  • Support our various fund raising projects

If you have any questions or would like more information or have any suggestions for how we can improve our site, please do not hesitate to contact us with those suggestions.

2008 Research Funded by YTCAF


Each year the AKC Canine Health Foundation send the YTCA Foundation a list of grant requests for funding that they have screened and think would be of interest to breeders and owners of Yorkshire Terriers as well as dog fanciers in general. As an independent entity spun off from the Parent club to preserve our tax exempt status, the YTCAF receives no financial support from the YTCA's participating in efforts such as the Purina Circles program. Instead all of our funding comes from memorials made by individual donors and fund raising efforts such as the online auctions and breeding calendar sales. 

The Board members carefully consider these factors in each of the requests in order to optimize research dollars:

  1. Potential of the research to benefit Yorkshire Terriers in particular and all dogs in general.

  2. Previous research success of the primary investigators

  3. Use of the grant project to help veterinary students, new veterinarians and academicians get started in their chosen field of research (Acorn projects).

The Board voted to support the following CHF grants for 2008.

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CHF Grant 963: Genotyping Small Breed Dogs with Portosystemic Vascular Anomalies and Microvascular Dysplasia

$7,000

Cornell University
Sharon A. Center, DVM, DiplACV

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Project Abstract

This study is exploring PSVA and MVD with the goal to identify a genetic marker for PSVA/MVD that will allow development of a genetic test. Extensive pedigree analysis support an autosomal dominant but incompletely penetrant mode of transmission, explaining the dismal success of attempted trait elimination based on SBA. It is important to eliminate this trait because affected dogs cause owner dissatisfaction, financial burden, and negative breed publicity, in addition to patient suffering. We have discovered significant linkage between the PSVA/MVD trait and genetic markers on one chromosome in a large kindred of Tibetan Spaniels. Findings have been confirmed with flanking markers and demonstration of similar linkage in Cairn Terriers and Maltese, and a smaller pedigree of Havanese. The project will pursue further genetic mapping (microsatellites, SNPs) of the PSVA/MVD trait in these and additional breeds, and undertake association mapping using DNA banked from unrelated pure breed dogs with PSVA (n = 100). We have accumulated blood for SBA measurements and DNA extraction from 1,081 dogs in informative pedigrees of 7 breeds (Tibetan Spaniel, Cairn Terrier, Maltese, orfolk Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier, Havanese, and Miniature Schnauzer). These dogs are kindred related (3-generations) and in most circumstances involved >9 pedigrees. We have additionally accumulated samples on >2,000 dogs (SBA and DNA) in these and other breeds that will be used for assessment of identified PSVA/MVD gene loci (other breed examples: Papillon, SOft Coat Fox Terrier, Pug, Shih Ezu, Dachshund, Shetland Sheepdog, Cocker Spaniel, Lhasa Apso, Boston Terrier, Norwich Terrier, Bichon Frise, Border Terrier, Chihuahua). The project is currently mapping newly acquired pedigrees to the chromosomal region of interest to confirm linkage needed to justify SNP analysis in our region of interest. A SNP array has been developed and the project will shortly proceed to fine gene SNP mapping.

UPDATE: November 30, 2009

Portosystemic vascular anomalies (PSVA) and microvascular dysplasia (MVD) are related genetic disorders causing malformation of the liver circulation. Afflicting a large number of smallpure breed dogs, this trait causes high serum bile acid (SBA) and has a prevalence ranging from 15% to 85%. The sever PSVA phenotype causes animal suffering, owner dissatisfaction, financial burden, and negative breed publicity. The less sever MVD phenotype allows silent trait perpetuation. Our goal is to identify a genetic marker for PSVA/MVD that will allow development of an affordable genetic test to guide breeding practices. SNP mapping in a region with microsatellite linkage supports an autosomal dominant, incompletely penetrant or polygenic mode of trait inheritance. Specific mathematical models for trait inheritance in different breeds are being developed. The study is fine mapping critical regions using custom designed SNP and sequencing arrays exploring for risk haplotypes that may be useful for discriminating affected from carrier dogs (test development). Genotyping samples have been acquired from >1,500 dogs from informative pedigrees of 7 breeds (Tibetan Spaniel, Cairn Terrier, Maltese, Norfolk Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier, Havanese, Miniature Schnauzer). Development of informative pedigrees (including parents and 2 or more siblings of a PSVA or MVD dog, including affected and unaffected dogs) are still needed from Papillons, Miniature Schnauzers, Shih Tzus, and Pugs. Genotyping data is consistent with wide genetic saturation of the traits in breeds with high disease prevalence. Individual samples from from >2,000 dogs (SBA and DNA) in multiple breeds (also including Soft Coat Fox Terrier, Pug, Shih Tzu, Dachshund, Shetland SHeepdog, Cocker Spaniel, Lhasa Apso, Boston Terrier, Norwich Terrier, Bichon Frise, Border Terrier, and Chihuahua) are on hand for assessment of identified PSVA/MVD disease risk loci as the project progresses.

UPDATE: May 31, 2009

Portosystemic Vascular Anomalies (PSVA) and Microvascular Dysplasia (MVD) are related genetic disorders causing malformation of the liver circulation.Affecting a large number of small pure breed dogs, this trait causes high serum bile acid (SBA) and has a prevalence ranging from 15% to 85%. The sever PSVA phenotype causes animal suffering, owner dissatisfaction, financial burden, and negative breed publicity. The less severe MVD phenotype allows silent trait perpetuation. Our goal is to identify a genetic marker for PSVA/MVD that will allow development of an affordable genetic test to guide breeding practices. Extensive pedigree analyses supports an autosomal dominant, incompletely penetrant mode of transmission that is likely polygenic, consistent with the dismal success of attempted trait elimination based solely on SBA concentrations. Significant linkage between the PSVA/MVD trait and a critical region on a single chromosome is confirmed in small purebred dog breeds under study. Genotyping samples have been acquired from >1,500 dogs from informatice pedigrees of 7 breeds (Tibetan Spaniel, Cairn Terrier, Maltese, Norfolk Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier, Havanese, Miniature Schnauzer). Development of informative pedigrees (including parents and two or more siblings of a PSVA or MVD dog, including affected and unaffected dogs) are needed from Papillons, Miniature Schnauzers, Shih Tzus and Pugs. Individual samples from >2,000 dogs (SBA and DNA) in multiple breeds (also including Soft Coat Fox Terrier, Pug, Shih Tzu, Dachshund, Shetland Sheepdog, Cocker SPaniel, Lhasa Apso, Boston Terrier, Norwich Terrier, Bichon Frise, Border Terrier, and Chihuahua) are on hand for assessment of identified PSVA/MVD disease risk loci as the project progresses. The study is currently fine mapping a critical region using a custom designed SNP array developed for the project.

Rabies Challenge Fund

$500

Hemopet
W. Jean Dodds, DVM and Ronald Schultz, DVM
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This is a long term study that is ongoing and studying the long term effects of the rabies vaccine.