YTCAF Donor Program

You can make a memorial to remember a very special friend or special pet or you can honor someone or their accomplishments or just make a donation via our donor program.  You can:

  • Make a donation by check or money order, using this form, mailed to our Treasurer at:
    Gloria Lyon, Treasurer
    YTCA Foundation
    526 N West Avenue PMB 46
    Arlington, WA 98223
  • Donate by using our Pay Pal donate button
  • Donate books, figurines, art, or other goods or services of value that YTCAF can auction at our yearly auctions
  • Support our various fund raising projects

If you have any questions or would like more information or have any suggestions for how we can improve our site, please do not hesitate to contact us with those suggestions.

2007 Research Funded by YTCAF


Each year the AKC Canine Health Foundation send the YTCA Foundation a list of grant requests for funding that they have screened and think would be of interest to breeders and owners of Yorkshire Terriers as well as dog fanciers in general. As an independent entity spun off from the Parent club to preserve our tax exempt status, the YTCAF receives no financial support from the YTCA's participating in efforts such as the Purina Circles program. Instead all of our funding comes from memorials made by individual donors and fund raising efforts such as the online auctions and breeding calendar sales.

The Board members carefully considered these factors in each of the requests in order to optimize research dollars:

  1. Potential of the research to benefit Yorkshire Terriers in particular and all dogs in general.

  2. Previous research success of the primary investigators

  3. Use of the grant project to help veterinary students, new veterinarians and academicians get started in their chosen field of research (Acorn projects).

The Board voted to support the following CHF grants for 2007.

bar

CHF Grant 759: Investigation of Antigenic Causes for Vaccine-Associated Allergic Reactions in Dogs

$1,000

Purdue University
George E. Moore, DVM, PhD

more » « less

Project Abstract

This research is funded to identify causes of vaccine-induced allergic reactions. Small dogs in general, and several specific breeds, are at higher risk for these reactions (Dachshund, Pug, Chihuahua, Boston Terrier, and Miniature Pinscher). Although the specific cause of allergic reactions in dogs remains unknown, vaccine components residual from the manufacturing process have been incriminated. These specific components need to be identified, so that manufacturers can make safer vaccines for dogs.

This study compared antibody concentrations in dogs recently experiencing allergic reactions after vaccination and compare them to antibody concentrations in dogs of the same breed that did not have reactions.

This grant is nearing completion. The final report due 12-31-2008 has not been received by the CHF.

CHF Grant 779: Characterization of the Canine Y Chromosome: Identifying Genes That Cause Male Infertility

$1,000

Texas A&M University
William J. Murphy, DVM

more » « less

Project Abstract

The causes of male infertility in dogs are not well known. This study aims to characterize the gene content of the dog Y chromosome by sequencing from a cDNA selection library that is enriched for Y chromosome gene transcripts, and mapping these in the canine genome. We have identified gene sequences from fifteen canine Y chromosome genes, characterized seven new canine-specific Y genes, and 15 novel candidate genes. Determining the copy number and function of these novel genes are of primary importance, as they are primary infertility candidate genes. We are currently completing the assembly of a physical map in collaboration with the Washington University Genome Center, as a prerequisite to eventually obtain the sequence of the dog Y chromosome. Future experiments will examine the expression profile of the genes identified thus far to determine which are testis-specific, and therefore serve as good candidate genes that when ablated or deleted lead to abnormal spermatogenesis in infertile dogs.

UPDATE: June 30, 2009

The causes of male infertility in dogs are not well known. Though much is now known about genes on the dog autosomes and X chromosome, owing to the canine genome sequence, virtually nothing is known about the canine Y chromosome and the genes it harbors. Studies of the human and mouse Y chromosomes have shown that they contain many testis-specific genes that when defective cause infertility and spermatogeneis defects. This study aims to characterize the gene content of the dog Y chromosome by sequencing from a cDNA selection library that is enriched for Y chromosome gene transcripts, and mapping these in the canine genome. We have identified gene sequences from fifteen canine Y chromosome genes, characterized seven new canine-specific Y genes, and fifteen novel candidate genes. Determining the copy number and function of these novel genes are of primary imporance, as they are primarily infertility candidate genes. Gene expression experiments have identified that eight of the novel dog genes are expressed only (or predominantly) in testes, implying a role in spermatogenesis. We are currently completing the assembly of a physical map in collaboration with the Washington University Genome Center, as a prerequisite to eventually obtain the sequence of the dog Y chromosome. A DNA sequence will allow the most detailed information for designing genetic tests to determine whether deletions in these genes lead to abnormal spermatogenesis in infertile dogs.

Rabies Challenge Fund

$500

W. Jean Dodds, DVM with Hemopet and Ronald Schultz, DVM, University of Wisconsin

more » « less

This is a long term study that is ongoing and studying the long term effects of the rabies vaccine for a consecutive seven year period.